Case #6.2 Colin Davies

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Copy of Chris Chase (1).png

Case #6.2 Colin Davies

15.00

In speaking with Colin after he heard Dana’s case (case #6), a working age male with Right back and PSIS region pain injured on the job, Colin suggested that we spend some time reviewing that case and allowing Colin to serve as a, sort of, color commentator.  

This has been one of the most popular and positively commented-on cases to date.  If you are challenged by those patients who don’t rapidly change or respond definitively, this is a great case to hear! (1hr 2min 37sec)

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In speaking with Colin after he heard Dana’s case (case #6), a working age male with Right back and PSIS region pain injured on the job, Colin suggested that we spend some time reviewing that case and allowing Colin to serve as a, sort of, color commentator.  

Colin highlights what he observed out of Dana’s clinical reasoning and why he anticipates Dana makes many of the comments he makes.

Really helpful insights of what Colin has observed over the years when the history is not clear and the location or classification doesn’t seem clear.

Colin discusses the importance of some questions to use in the history to rule in or out the classification derangement.  He reminisces on many things he’d learned from time spent with Robin Mckenzie related to the patient response in the exam.

We discuss the observation Colin made that Dana demonstrated not becoming biased and some examples of how clinicians might slip back into that mistake.

Colin quotes that saying from Yogi Berra, “When you get to the fork in the road… take it!”  You can hear how this pertains to the physical exam and as you conduct the repeated movement exam.

He also offers great recommendations as to how to educate the patient so they understand the purpose of the exam and the the repeated movements and not get upset if symptoms worsen.

This has been one of the most popular and positively commented-on cases to date.  If you are challenged by those patients who don’t rapidly change or respond definitively, this is a great case to hear! (1hr 2min 37sec)