Episode 92 - Jerome Fryer, part 1: Dynamic Disc Designs

Dr. Jerome Fryer BSc, DC

Dr. Jerome Fryer obtained his bachelor of science degree in biopsychology from the University of British Columbia in 1995 and then obtained his doctorate degree in chiropractic, graduating with honors, from the University of Western States, Portland Oregon in 1999. He has been in private practice since 2000 and more recently is in Nanaimo, BC.  Along with patient care he has been involved inconducting spine research and crafting spine education models. He lectures on the topics of degenerative disc disease and related spinal hydraulics and nutrition. He is owner and founder of Dynamic Disc Designs a dynamic spine model company.Show Notes


  This Episode Brought to You by Dynamic Disc Designs. Arguably the most accurate dynamic spine models on the market.  Use promo code mcareforum to receive 10% off your first purchase!  

 

This Episode Brought to You by Dynamic Disc Designs. Arguably the most accurate dynamic spine models on the market.  Use promo code mcareforum to receive 10% off your first purchase!

 

Show Notes

 

Personal Background

Dr. Fryer lives in British Columbia, Canada outside of Vancouver.  He and his family enjoy the nature there.  He mentions his father and mother have influenced him and his pursuits. 

Professional Background

Jerome outlines his journey even including time he spent working on a tugboat prior to his professional school.  He shares his schooling which included biopsychology at first and then chiropractic school and also touches on the evolution of his career with research and his “chair care” (see here) and finally includes his newer venture of building life-like dynamic spine models with his company Dynamic Disc Designs.  

Movement into Research

Jerome found some simple seated movement helpful in his own clinical experience and wanted to study the effect on patient spine height and further wanted to work toward more scientific and accurate measurements to determine the effects of this sitting exercise.

Migration into Spine Models

In purchasing what he understood was the best spine model out there he found them to be static and not resembling an actual specimen.  He began searching for animal spines from supermarkets and butchers and with hunters to learn of their properties and over two and a half years developed his first model.  Since then he's produced 22 different models showing various unique pathologies.